Joker, Part 1: Mental Illness, Poverty & Loneliness in a Broken System

joker mural
Put on a happy face.

“What do you get when you cross a mentally ill loner with a society that abandons him and treats him like trash?” Arthur Fleck (Joaquin Phoenix) will tell you. “What you fucking deserve!” Joker, 2019, dir. Todd Phillips, is the Joker we deserve.

Which is why this film disturbs and terrifies. There is no combustion in a vacuum. If Howard Beale (Peter Finch, Network, 1976, dir. Sydney Lumet) had yelled “I’m mad as hell, and I’m not going to take it anymore!” into the camera, and his viewers at home weren’t already fed up, no one would have run to their window. No one would have joined in the chorus of their neighbors screaming the slogan. And Howard Beale would have simply lost his job.

And Joker would not have earned over a billion at the box office, been nominated for eleven Academy Awards, nor feared by Tipper Gore moms and theater chains if it didn’t have one fat, clown shoe firmly planted in our world. Our world where mass shootings crowd the news, the gap between the rich and those barely holding on increases, the holes in our social safety net widen, the rampant untreated mental illness of our war veterans, crushing poverty, Incells, opiates, and a rate of “deaths of despair” by over-dose or suicide that has lowered our national life expectancy. This nation spiraling towards chaos. This horrifying world on fire.

This tale of a lonely, damaged man soaks in the visual cues and themes of pre-Star Wars American classics from the 70s. When Time Square was a seedy string of peep shows and pawn shops. The ignominious Nixon presidency and ineffectual Carter administration. The end of the Vietnam war with its alienated veterans. Drugs like cocaine and heroin replaced weed and acid, as the Boomer generation’s Flower Power wave broke, and receded back into the primordial ooze.

Boldly shunning slick CGI destruction, clear good versus evil, and countless bloodless deaths of no consequence, Joker is murky, full of questions and consequences. Beginning with exactly one logo: the Warner Bros. logo from 1981, the movie trips up your first expected step into its world. From there we are thrown onto the graffitied and trash filled streets of Gotham (New York) City in 1981. And into the tortured life of Arthur Fleck. But, make no mistake, this is not Taxi Driver except he’s a clown. The references to that film, Network, The French Connection, etc. root us in a known world, while standing alone as a story firmly rooted in our own time. Even the name, Arthur Fleck, seems like a twisted pun on Art Flick.

I was drawn to see the film, and write about it for its gorgeous use of visual story-telling, music, color, and fabulous actors because I am a film student. But also because the film deals with mental illness, loneliness, poverty, abuse, and a society so broken we’re thinking about electing an 80 year old man who promises us everything for nothing. And that is the world I live in.

We first meet Arthur at the rent-a-clown agency where he works. We learn that he lives with the invalid mother (Frances Conroy) he supports. That he tells people he aspires to be a comedian, like I tell people I’m a writer. He visits a therapist at Arkham State Asylum like the horrible places that pass for mental health clinics in my life, takes seven different pills (I take four to five, but one three times a day), and carries a card to show strangers when his brain trauma causes him to break into torturous, uncontrollable laughter no matter what emotion he may be feeling. He has elaborate fantasies/delusions (I’m working on this!), but more than anything, Arthur hopes his life is more than “a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing” (Mac 5. 5. 24-27)

Or, as he writes in the “joke diary” he coyly produces for his therapist to read, “I just hope my death makes more sc cents than my life.” He wants someone to truly see him, and love him for who he truly is. But he may be the loneliest, most over-looked man in the world. The saddest clown ever.

Physically, Arthur is emaciated. His skin looks translucent stretched over his rib cage and bones. His straggly, greasy hair, reaches his shoulders, sometimes looking mousy light brown, others appearing black. His gaunt face is angular, with a long nose, and large, deep set eyes that shift from blue to black that mirror a light within that varies from sparkling, to confused, from enraged betrayal, to murderous fire.

On a personal level, Fleck, painfully shy, awkward, and effeminate (from our Macho Man society’s point of view) likes to dance, visits comedy clubs to take notes, and seems to genuinely enjoy being a clown. His mom calls him “Happy,” and says he was put on earth to make people smile. But we see glimpses of another side of his personality. He slashes at his Mom’s dinner to cut it for her, while patiently engaging in her incessant ramblings and letter writing to Thomas Wayne, the richest man in Gotham. He twinges with resentment when she explains that Wayne, whom she worked for thirty years ago, would be “sickened” if he saw how they were living. He fixates on and stalks his cute, single mom neighbor down the hall (Zazie Beets). And imagines that Murray Franklin (Robert DiNero), his favorite late-night host, picks him out of a crowded audience, and admits that he’d give up his fame and show-biz to have “a son like you.” And there is his ever-present laugh, which he vomits out like there is a wild beast trapped within that slight figure, and it wants out.

In fact, Arthur’s entire life seems to be lived in locked in confined spaces. The camera barely nudges down long rows of lockers at his job, in cramped rooms full of folder files or dusty tchotchkes. The streets he walks are narrowed by ever-growing heaps of trash bags from the city’s garbage crisis. The commuter trains are packed with unhappy humanity. Walls are covered in graffiti. And the long staircase he trudges up nightly on his way home seems longer and steeper each time we see him do it.

When we are close to Arthur, we see him through dirty glass, metal bars, and mesh grates. Or he is shown in close-up, his face taking up only half the screen, as his pained features react to the disembodied voices of characters off-screen. He seems to melt into the sickly green of institutional fluorescents, yellow tinged sunlight through grimy windows, or covered in deep blues and maroon, brick-reds, untidy whites. The colors of his world.

Through this constraining and muddled lens, we watch Arthur’s daily routine. Painting his face, stuffing his hands in his mouth and twisting his face into grotesque grins, crying through his clown makeup while he listens to the bad news on the radio. And all the while that laugh like the howls of a wounded animal. I know that howl. It’s the primal noise you make when you are utterly alone.

Arthur gets beat up a lot. In an early scene, he’s in his clown costume, trying to be seen between the press of people and ever-piling garbage spinning a sign that reads, “EVERYTHING MUST GO!” A group of punks steal his sign, and we learn Arthur can run. Finally following the kids into an alley made narrower by the ever-present black trash bags. He’s jumped. He drops immediately to the ground and assumes the fetal position. No crying out or fighting back as he’s repeatedly kicked, while people pass perpendicularly in the back ground. Just stay still, and wait for it to stop. I recognized this move. This is how I learned to react to abuse. Arthur is a pro.

The colors of his bruises remain with him through the rest of the film slowly turning from blue, to purple, to greenish-yellow. And then a co-worker uses the excuse of Arthur’s beating to push a .38 special and bullets in a brown paper bag on him. He says it’s a “favor,” and Arthur can owe him one. Arthur squeals with nervous laughter at the sight of the thing. And yet, this a turning point for him. One that will both give him the confidence to try to achieve his dreams, yet set him inexorably on the road to the collision of his fantasy world and his reality, and his ultimate transformation.

There is a lot we don’t know about Arthur. We learn that Arthur doesn’t seem to know a whole lot about himself. In fact, we don’t even know if he is The Joker. But this film disturbs because, whatever we have faced in life, most of us can relate to the struggles, loneliness, and fears of Arthur Fleck. That is a rough lens to view anyone through, mainly yourself. And while most of us manage somehow, there are many Arthurs out there, slipping through the cracks. Grasping desperately for something real to hold onto. Hoping against hope that somewhere there is someone who cares.

There is simply too much I want to say about this film for one blog. I hope you’ll stick with me until next time, as we follow Arthur’s journey to Joker.

In the mean time, remember Charlie Chaplin’s injunction:

🎶Smile, though your heart is aching
Smile, even though it’s breaking
When there are clouds in the sky
you’ll get by
If you smile through your fear and sorrow
Smile and maybe tomorrow
You’ll see the sun come shining through
for you

Light up your face with gladness
Hide every trace of sadness
Although a tear may be ever so near
That’s the time you must keep on trying
Smile what’s the use of crying
You’ll find that life is still worthwhile
If you’ll just
Smile🎶

-JL 🤡👈

While you’re here: check out the wonderful work done by the people at The National Alliance on Mental Illness and donate.

Check out my Instagram! There are pictures of stuff!

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About JLakis

Jessica Lakis - Writer/screenwriter. Geek & mental health blogger. Conqueror of the Useless. NERD INVICTA! View all posts by JLakis

7 responses to “Joker, Part 1: Mental Illness, Poverty & Loneliness in a Broken System

  • Joker, Part 1: Mental Illness, Poverty & Loneliness in a Broken System – Take a Shot -Facing Bipolar, Depression, Anxiety and Suicide

    […] Joker, Part 1: Mental Illness, Poverty & Loneliness in a Broken System — Read on cinescribelakis.com/2020/01/16/joker-part-1-mental-illness-poverty-loneliness-in-a-broken-system/ […]

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  • Joker, part 2: Boot-straps, Double-standards & Catch-22 | Jessica Lakis

    […] If you missed Part 1 of my Joker series, hace clíc aqui. […]

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  • Barbara

    I love this piece, Jess. It’s sad and oh so relevant to not only what is happening in our present times, after all we have a sort of joker in the WH, a deranged, narcissistic, megalomaniac making us, well forcing us to notice him, but also for what has gone before and what may well be in store for civilization in the near or distant future.

    Holy crap, our POTUS IS the Joker on many disturbing yet not surprising levels. Our Joker has a whole body of “distinguished” lawmakers debating his actions and inactions as they decide his fate. Will they just accept him as a sad and even dangerous metaphor for what is going on in the world at large or will they punish him for being exactly what society, family as well as outsiders, knowingly created?

    I dont know but I do know this, the world is a crazy, scary, dangerous yet beautiful place, where people tempt deadly poisonous snakes and either get bitten and die or live to tell the tale and learn new survival skills as a result of the encounter, survival skills they (we) can teach others as they (we) see fit.

    I for one, prefer to live and teach others how to survive the many snake bites that await us all “out there” rather than squander what valuable skills, (I prefer to call them “tricks”) we learn on this wacky journey we call life.

    Carry on, luv, keep on writing as will I. Because you know what? It’s a worthwhile endeavor and if we can teach or help or calm or inspire others with what we write then we have, in my opinion, accomplished something worthwhile. ♡♡♡

    PS. Tomorrow, or today depending on where you are in the world, let’s say on friday, for me it’s more work on the novel SPECIAL, then take Merlin to the vet to see what’s ailing his hindquarters, then a visit for some blond ale at Bonfire Brewery where the blue On The Hook, or is it “Off” The Hook (I can never remember) fish and chips food truck will be stationed for the best fish and chips I have ever had and I’ve sampled what others have claimed to be the best, including Bit O’ Scotland in WLA in my youth. Good night, luv, and may whatever force you believe in, be with you now and forever going forward. ♡

    Liked by 1 person

    • JLakis

      Thanks Babs!😊 That comparison to Trump is apt! And there will be a bit more politics in Part 2. The main difference being that Arthur Fleck/Joker doesn’t set out to start a revolution. He’s just taken up as a symbol for the rest of the city’s citizens who feel left behind.

      But we definitely have a chaotic nihilistic criminal in the WH. I want our republic to withstand this test. I want the rule of law for all. But I also want equity and equality for all Americans, for all people. These are not just American rights, they are human rights. But this country and culture has betrayed its own people, our allies abroad, and sewn a harvest we’re going to eventually reap. So the biggest test is really: do we succumb to violent rebellion and rage? Or can we recover some form of decency, kindness, and that word “civility.” It’s barbarism versus civilization. I’m a fan of civilization. It allows stuff like interesting movies, and time to write, and read and appreciate our world.

      Well, anyway, sweetie darling, stay tuned. I’ve had such writer’s block! And so many unpublished blogs I gave up on. But I really picked up journaling again, and then I banged my head against a keyboard for a week or so on this piece. I needed to talk about it. And I’m happy it’s out there now. Like you said, just being read and perhaps bringing a new thought or idea or feeling to someone is what it’s all about for me. Would I like to be paid? Sure! But we all just want to be seen. This is certainly a healthier way than to put on clown makeup and incite violence.😅💚💚💚

      Liked by 1 person

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